Professor Bryan Campbell Clarke FRS

Founder

Bryan Campbell Clarke was born on June 24 1932 and spent the early years of his life in Nottinghamshire, where his father was a leather dealer. Following the outbreak of war he was sent away to the Bahamas, where, running wild on the seashore, he developed an interest in shells and snails. Returning to Britain in 1945, he won a scholarship to Magdalen College School, Oxford. After two years’ National Service as a pilot officer in the RAF, he read Zoology at Magdalen College, Oxford, then took a DPhil.

Following three years as a Nature Conservancy research student at Oxford, in 1959 he moved to Edinburgh University, where he rose from assistant lecturer to reader in the Zoology department. In 1971 he was appointed Foundation Professor of Genetics at Nottingham University, where he remained until his retirement in 1997 (after which he became professor emeritus), serving as head of department from 1971 to 1976, and again from 1981 to 1993.
Clarke rescued some of the Partula snails by taking them back to his laboratory in Nottingham, where they thrived on a diet of porridge, lettuce and tissue paper. He managed to breed five of the seven species he brought back, sending specimens to zoos around the world, helping to establish an international breeding programme. In 1994 some of the snails were reintroduced to a specially-protected trial reserve on the Pacific island of Moorea. The experiment showed that the snails could be successfully reintroduced.

Dame Anne Laura Dorinthea McLaren, DBE, FRS, FRCOG

Founder

Dame Anne Laura Dorinthea McLaren was a leading authority on mammalian genetics and helped to develop the techniques that led to human in vitro fertilisation (IVF). During her research career, Anne McLaren published more than 300 scientific papers. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1975 and awarded one of the society’s Royal medals in 1990. She was elected a Fellow of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in 1986.

She was Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society from 1991 to 1996; president of the British Association for the Advancement of Science in 1993-94; and Fullerian Professor of Physiology at the Royal Institution from 1992 to 1996.

In 2001 she won a Unesco award for women in science and the next year was awarded the Japan Prize, with Andrzej K Tarkowski, for her contributions to developmental biology. Well known for her work to promote more women in science, she was also president of the Association for Women in Science and Engineering.

Dr Ann Clarke

Trustee and Founder

An immunologist, former research scientist in Edinburgh, Nottingham and Cambridge studying the immunological interactions between mother and embryo in the mouse. In her work, she tried to understand why the baby, whose inherits half its antigens from the father which are foreign to her, is not rejected like any other foreign graft. She was also an Inspector for the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority for 6 years and was a member of 6 scientific expeditions to the islands of French Polynesian Islands and the Tongian Archipelago. Dr Clarke has been the Managing Trustee of the Frozen Ark Project since its inception

Ann is the last surviving founding member and has kept the Frozen Ark afloat with her drive and enthusiasm. She has been the main contact and promoter of the Ark for a number of years. Ann will continue to work with the consortium members/partners and help with ideas, activities and media attention.

Dr Ann Clarke
Frozen Ark Office
School of Life Sciences
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham HG7 2RD
ann.clarke@nottingham.ac.uk
frozen.ark@nottingham.ac.uk
+44 (0)115 9513 219

Dr Ann Clarke

Trustee and Founder

An immunologist, former research scientist in Edinburgh, Nottingham and Cambridge studying the immunological interactions between mother and embryo in the mouse. In her work, she tried to understand why the baby, whose inherits half its antigens from the father which are foreign to her, is not rejected like any other foreign graft. She was also an Inspector for the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority for 6 years and was a member of 6 scientific expeditions to the islands of French Polynesian Islands and the Tongian Archipelago. Dr Clarke has been the Managing Trustee of the Frozen Ark Project since its inception

Ann is the last surviving founding member and has kept the Frozen Ark afloat with her drive and enthusiasm. She has been the main contact and promoter of the Ark for a number of years. Ann will continue to work with the consortium members/partners and help with ideas, activities and media attention.

Dr Ann Clarke
Frozen Ark Office
School of Life Sciences
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham HG7 2RD
ann.clarke@nottingham.ac.uk
frozen.ark@nottingham.ac.uk
+44 (0)115 9513 219

Professor Brendon Noble FRSB, FRSA.

Trustee

Professor Brendon Noble is a medicines development specialist and biotechnologist with an interest in musculoskeletal health, biomaterials and cell therapy production. He has been working in the field of stem cell biology since 1989. He developed his work in the Medical School at Cambridge University where he jointly held a Medical Research Council (MRC) Programme grant in the MRC Bone Group and was then Professor of Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh where he directed the Bone and Cartilage Repair Programme in the Medical Research Council “Centre for Regenerative Medicine”. His research work has been funded by the MRC, the Royal Society of Edinburgh, the UK Stem Cell Foundation, Pfizer, Novartis, Geron Corporation and other sources to a value of over £10 million.

Professor Noble has co-founded two cell therapy companies and has patented in the cell therapy field. He is familiar with the complexities and challenges associated with new cell therapy production for clinical use. In addition, he has served on vision groups for a range of innovation parks and incubators, is Chair of the Life Sciences Sector Group of the New Anglia Enterprise Partnership (LEP), Universities Representative on the Heart of the South West Local Enterprise Partnership European Structural Investment Fund Group, a member of the Academic Health Sciences Network Industry Advisory Group, has served as, Board Member of the Norfolk and Suffolk Dementia Alliance and sits on the board of the Social Enterprise Mark.

He is Trustee and Director of the medical charity the UK Stem Cell Foundation, Trustee and a Board member of the Frozen Ark charity and is a Fellow of both the Royal Society of Biology and the Royal Society of Arts. He currently holds an appointment as Pro-Vice Chancellor, Research & Innovation and Professor of Regenerative Medicine at the University of St Mark & St John, Plymouth.

Brendon is a Trustee of the Frozen Ark and has initiated some of the thinking around external communication and public engagement. He is an expert in the isolation and cryopreservation of stem cells for human medical use and brings this level of thinking to the team.

Professor Brendon Noble FRSB, FRSA
Pro Vice-Chancellor Research, Innovation & International
University of St Mark & St John
Derriford Road, Plymouth, PL6 8BH
Direct Line +441752636821
Email: bnoble@marjon.ac.uk

Professor Mike Bruford

Interim Director and Trustee

Mike Bruford is Professor of Biodiversity at the School of Biosciences, Cardiff University. After gaining his PhD in DNA profiling in animals from the University of Leicester in 1990, Mike worked for the Zoological Society of London as a conservation biologist for nine years, before moving in Cardiff in 1999. Mike’s research focuses on the population biology of endangered species, with a special focus on those found in fragmented habitat. He uses DNA profiling to gain information about elusive animal species, which helps to build a picture about their population size and distribution, often in inhospitable habitats where direct observation is impossible.

Mike serves on the editorial boards of several major scientific journals and is currently Editor in Chief of Heredity, an international journal in genetics, owned by the Genetics Society. He also currently serves on the Steering Committee for the Wales Biodiversity Partnership and a number of national and international grant awarding bodies. He was awarded the Zoological Society of London’s Scientific Medal in 2003, was elected a Fellow of the Learned Society of Wales in 2010 and is a Royal Society Wolfson Research Merit Award holder (2012-2016).

Their contribution to The Frozen Ark Project: Mike is currently Interim Director of the Frozen Ark project. His expertise is in genetic management of endangered species and the interaction between the genetic resources of wild species and of zoo, other captive populations and domestic species. He is currently co-Chair of the IUCN Species Survival Commission’s Conservation Genetics Specialist Group and helps to ensure genetic evidence is used on conservation planning at an international level.

Contact Details:

Michael W. Bruford FLSW
Professor of Biodiversity
School of Biosciences
Sir Martin Evans Building
Cardiff University
Cathays Park
Cardiff CF10 3AX
Wales, UK
Tel: 02920 874312 or 870974
Email: BrufordMW@Cardiff.ac.uk

Professor Ed Louis

Trustee

Ed obtained a BSc in Biology and Mathematics from Clarkson University in upstate New York. This set him up well for his PhD in the ‘Population Genetics of Complex Human Traits’ from the University of California at Berkeley in 1986. 
A postdoctoral fellowship at Brandeis University started his work with yeast as a model organism. In 1991, as part of the reverse brain drain, Ed moved to the Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford as a Wellcome Trust Senior Research Fellow in Basic Biomedical Sciences, where he continued using yeast to study telomeres, genome stability and evolution as well as develop tools for analysing telomeres from various parasites. He was part of the project that completed the first eukaryotic genome, a prelude to the human genome project. This was followed by a brief stint as an Oxford Don in Biochemistry where he was “rescued from an expanding waistline, due to dinners at college,” by appointment as Professor of Genetics at the University of Leicester in 2000. In 2005 he was temporarily wooed away to the University of Nottingham as Professor of Genome Dynamics. There he initiated the population genomics analysis of yeast with Richard Durbin of the Sanger Institute, which was a prelude to the 1000 human genome project’s informatics development. Eight years to the day, he returned to Leicester as Director of the Centre for the Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits (GACT). Ed is on the editorial board of several journals, serves on research committees for the BBSRC, the Royal Society, and the Portuguese Research Council (FCT). He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology.

Edd is currently chair of the board of Trustees managing the meetings and decision-making process for Frozen Ark activities.

Prof Ed Louis
Centre for Genetic Architecture of Complex Traits
Department of Genetics
University of Leicester
Leicester LE1 7RH, UK
Email: ejl21@le.ac.uk
+44 (0)116 2297813

Professor John Ansell

Trustee

Since his retirement in 2004, Professor John Ansell has been Professor Emeritus at the University of Edinburgh in the School of Molecular and Clinical Medicine. Prior to that he held the Chair of Experimental Haematology, and was Head of Division of Oncology, Director of the University of Edinburgh-Leukaemia Research Fund, John Hughes Bennett Laboratories and Deputy Director, Edinburgh University Cancer Research Centre. His recent involvements have been in the promotion of regenerative medicine variously as Director of Project Development, UK Stem Cell Foundation and a member of the MRC/UKSCF Scientific Advisory Board; as Director and co-founder of the Scottish Stem Cell Network (SSCN) and now a member of its Advisory Group and also (until 2007) as a Co-Director and founder member of the Scottish Instrumentation and Research Centre for Advanced Mass Spectrometry (SIRCAMS). Although the latter part of his academic and research career has been in the Medical Faculty of the University of Edinburgh and concerned with the properties of bone marrow stem cells and their relationship to the development of leukaemias, Professor Ansell is a scientist, graduating with a BSc (Hons) from the University of Nottingham, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and gaining a PhD under the supervision of Dr Anne McLaren at the University of Edinburgh, Institute of Animal Genetics.

Edd is an active trustee bringing stem cell expertise to the project. Also brings considerable experience as a trustee of other charities.

Prof John Ansell
Professor Emeritus
School of Molecular and Clinical Medicine (now Molecular, Genetic and Population Health Sciences)
University of Edinburgh
Western General Hospital
EdinburghEH4 2XU
john.d.ansell@btinternet.com

Professor John Armour

Trustee

Professor of Human Genetics, School of Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, and has research interests in human genetic diversity, with a particular focus on DNA copy number variation in the human genome. He was Head of the School of Biology at Nottingham 2008 and 2013, during which time he arranged support from the University of Nottingham in the early days of the Frozen Ark. He served as Honorary Secretary of the Genetics Society between 2003 and 2008, managing the regulatory and constitutional affairs of the Society, including liaison with the Charity Commission. In 2010 he was elected as a Fellow of the (now Royal) Society of Biology.

John has a particular role in facilitating liaison between the Frozen Ark and the University of Nottingham. Although the two bodies are independent, the University of Nottingham has hosted and enthusiastically supported the Ark since its inception. John’s previous experience as a Head of School in the University of Nottingham, and in managing the charitable status of the Genetics Society, are of particular value in this role.

Prof John Armour
School of Life Sciences
University of Nottingham
Medical School, QMC
Nottingham
NG7 2UH
john.armour@nottingham.ac.uk
+44-(0)115 8230308

Paul Pearce-Kelly

Trustee

Dr. Pearce-Kelly is Senior Curator of Invertebrates, Lower Vertebrates and Research at the Zoological Society of London. In addition to his curatorial focus, Paul coordinates the Zoological Department’s research and conservation planning and specialises in species conservation programmes and group-based demographic management and analysis. Fieldwork is focused on the UK, French Polynesia, Kenya and St Helena. Paul serves on a range of SSC taxon Specialist Groups in addition to the Reintroduction Specialist Group and the Strategic Committee of the Conservation Breeding Specialist Group. He is a recipient of the Ulysses S. Seal Innovation in Conservation Award.
 
In recent years Paul has concentrated on efforts to help clarify the climate change and ocean acidification threats to biodiversity and their mitigation and adaptation requirements. This has included collaborating with IUCN and wider colleagues to determine species vulnerability traits (Foden and Collen 2007), the planetary-scale threat to tropical coral reefs (Veron et al 2009), Appendix 1 migratory species (McNamara et al 2010) and freshwater fish (Pearce-Kelly et al 2013). Other activities include chairing the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) Climate Change Task Force, coordinating the international mosquito monitoring programme Project MOSI, helping refine the Population and Habitat Viability Analysis (PHVA) tool and maintaining the joint WAZA, BGCI, CBSG, IUCN, ZSL iterative reference list of climate change & ocean acidification science, policy  & related information.

Given Paul’s network of contacts at zoological parks, he provides a link between the Frozen Ark and zoos across the globe.

Zoological Society of London
Regent’s Park
London NW1 4RY
Telephone: (+ 44) 0207 449 6400
Paul.Pearce-Kelly@zsl.org

Professor David Whittingham

Trustee

Professor Whittingham is an Emeritus Professor at St. George’s, University of London. He pioneered in vitro culturing of mammalian preimplantation embryos, and the first successful freezing of mammalian ova. He was also the first to recognise the importance of intracellular calcium release in oocyte activation. Prof. Whittingham was a Fulbright scholar at the University of Pennsylvania. Further accolades include being a named Scholar of Johns Hopkins University, and a recipient of the Marshall Medal for Society for the Study of Fertility. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, Fellow of the Royal Society of Medicine, and Fellow of the Institute of Biology.

Hi is an active trustee who brings expertise in cryobiology and the storage of various cell and gamete samples.

David Whittingham
Emeritus Professor
St. George’s, University of London
Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE
sggr300@sgul.ac.uk

Dr Lisa Yon

Trustee

Dr. Lisa Yon is a veterinary physiologist and Lecturer in Zoo and Wildlife Medicine at the University of Nottingham-School of Veterinary Medicine and Science.  She has worked with and studied the health and welfare of wildlife for almost 20 years in Europe, North America, and Southeast Asia.  She has experience with the development of novel technologies for surveillance and diagnosis of zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases in wildlife (such as rodents), and the use of a One Health approach linking ecosystem, human and animal health. She currently serves as Chair of the European Wildlife Disease Association, and is a member of the IUCN Wildlife Health Specialist Group.  She is also a member of BIAZA’s Elephant Welfare Group (government advisory committee), and serves on the Ethics Committee of the Zoological Society of London, and on the Health and Welfare Committee of Twycross Zoo.

Lisa is the treasurer of the Board of Trustees, with links to zoo veterinarians in the UK and beyond.

Lisa Yon, BSc, DVM, PhD, MRCVS
Lecturer in Zoo and Wildlife Medicine
School of Veterinary Medicine and Science
University of Nottingham 
Sutton Bonington Campus
LE12 5RD
email: lisa.yon@nottingham.ac.uk
Tel. +44 (0)115 951 6358

Professor William Holt

Tissue and Cell collection (zoo animals)

Visiting Professor at the University of Sheffield I have been awarded three Honorary Professorships by (1) the Royal Veterinary College, London (2) the University College London and (3) the University of Bedfordshire. I am also an Honorary Research Associate of the Smithsonian Institution’s ‘Center for Species Survival’ in Washington DC. I became Head of the Reproductive Biology group at the Institute of Zoology in 1995 and retained that position until the end of September 2011 when the research group was closed.

Professor David Rawson

Emeritus Professor of Applied Cell Biology, University of Bedfordshire.

Tissue and cell collection – fish. Fish Taxon Expert Group

Dr Christopher Wade

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Nottingham
Responsible for protocol for collection and sample conservation, mollusc Taxon Expert Group

Professor Heribert Hofer

Director of Leibzig Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW), Berlin, Germany

Liaison between the Frozen Ark and the European zoo community

Jacqueline McKenzie-Dodds

Molecular Collections Manager, Life Sciences Departmnet, Natural History Museum, London

Frozen Ark Museum collection

Dominic Lerman

Group Manager, Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT · Department of Cell Biology and Applied Virology · Environmental Specimen Bank

Germany · Sankt Ingbert

Ms Jude Smith

Administrator of the Frozen Ark project